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ETC

Numéro 96, juin-octobre 2012, p. 63-65

Du spirituel dans l’art

Direction : Isabelle Lelarge (directrice) et Céline Pereira (directrice adjointe)

Rédaction : Isabelle Lelarge (rédactrice en chef)

Éditeur : Revue d'art contemporain ETC

ISSN : 0835-7641 (imprimé)  1923-3205 (numérique)

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Panmorphic Painting Paradise: The Art of Michael MerrillMichael Merrill, Panmorphic Painting, Outremont Art Gallery, Montreal. Nov. 24 – Dec. 18, 2011

James D. Campbell

Résumé | Extrait

Michael Merrill, Expo. Art Mûr, Montréal. Panmorphic Painting Paradise: The Art of Michael Merrill Michael Merrill, Panmorphic Painting, Outremont Art Gallery, Montreal. Nov. 24 – Dec. 18, 2011 “But, after all, the aim of art is to create space — space that is not compromised by decoration or illustration, space within which the subjects of painting can live.” – Frank Stella, Working Space (1986) The paintings Merrill exhibited here were all from his extended Panmorphic (pan meaning all and morph meaning form) series.1 This series occupied him from 1993 to 2002 (plus one sequel in 2011) and demonstrates his remarkable vision, technical virtuosity and mastery of scale, ranging from the miniature to the outsized. Merrill assembled an exhaustive archive of images for each subject, with locations ranging from within his own studio to exterior views (usually but not exclusively of the downtown core) in Montreal and elsewhere. The archive contained images that would later comprise 360-degree views of the various sites, with the artist assuming shifting perspectives on each subject. The resultant spherical views on a two-dimensional surface yield a genuine epiphany and something like awe for the viewer. Merrill’s keen desire (perhaps obsession) to emplace the viewer within the image speaks volumes about his avowed purpose and obvious generosity as a visual artist. Unlike the ordinary perceptual situation in real life, the paintings value equally everything that comes under the painter’s purview: window, door, table, chair, even the rafters. The series gestated in a host of questions about composition and thinking about how to include the totality of a given space in a single painting. Merrill says: “In a rectangle, the object closest to the centre of the composition seems to become the subject. As a painter, I am very aware that the spaces between things are as important to a painting as the things themselves. The “Arnolfini Wedding” is proof of that. The...

Auteur : James D. Campbell
Titre : Panmorphic Painting Paradise: The Art of Michael Merrill
Ouvrage recensé : Michael Merrill, Panmorphic Painting, Outremont Art Gallery, Montreal. Nov. 24 – Dec. 18, 2011
Revue : ETC, Numéro 96, juin-octobre 2012, p. 63-65
URI : http://id.erudit.org/iderudit/67043ac

Tous droits réservés © Revue d'art contemporain ETC, 2012

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