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Études/Inuit/Studies

Volume 26, numéro 2, 2002, p. 133-156

Populations et migrations / Populations and Migrations

Direction : Murielle Nagy (directeur)

Rédaction : Murielle Nagy (rédactrice en chef)

Éditeur : Association Inuksiutiit Katimajiit Inc.

ISSN : 0701-1008 (imprimé)  1708-5268 (numérique)

DOI : 10.7202/007648ar

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Article

Protecting the authenticity and integrity of inuksuit within the arctic milieu

Scott Heyes

Department of Geography,

McGill University,

Montréal (Québec), Canada, H3A 2K6.

scott.heyes@mail.mcgill.ca

 

Figure 1

Large Inuksuk on Baffin Island, Nunavut c. 1970.

Photo: Prof. Peter Jacobs, Université de Montréal.

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Figure 2

Inuksuit on ridge top near the Inuit village Quaqtaq, Nunavik, 2000.

Described to author by Inuit elder David Okpik as indicating a safe place to make camp. Photo by the author.

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Figure 3

Inuksugait pointer marking direction to the Cache.

Drawn by anonymous Isummasaqvik School Student (Quaqtaq) March 1999.

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Figure 4

Niungvaliruluit inuksuit mark a navigation route across the landscape.

Drawn by anonymous Isummasaqvik School Student (Quaqtaq), March 1999.

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Figure 5

Tikkuutit pointer.

Translation of Inuktitut text: "the piles of rocks in the middle are pointers. The people who own the qamutik had left this message for the next traveller to inform him where they were staying and the direction to take to get there. The pointer has three rocks under it, which implies that it takes three nights to get there. A note is also tied to the top or the pole for further instruction. This is how the inland Inuit used to describe travel directions." Tuumasi Kudluk Collection, D-34, Avataq Cultural Institute, Montreal.

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Figure 6

Aulaqquat ’bogeyman’ inuksuit.

Translation of Inuktitut text: "During the September migration, the caribou have to cross the lakes and rivers they meet along their route. The crossing areas are called nalluit (nalluk, sg.). The nalluit were traditionally used for hunting caribou. Lines of Inuksuit were erected to direct the flow of caribou toward the narrowest part of the lake, where the Inuit waited. While the caribou crossed, the Inuit in qayaqs would shoot arrows at them, and also use the ipuligaq- a long spear. When the caribou set foot on the other side of the crossing, they encountered a series of Inuksuit, of which they had to follow. There again, hunters were waiting with bows and arrows." Tuumasi Kudluk Collection, D-6, Avataq Cultural Institute, Montreal.

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Figure 7

Inuksuk as a tourist attraction along a section of Stanley Park, Vancouver.

Photo by the author, 2001.

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Figure 8

Innunguait "a likeness of a human" greets people as an entry sign to the Inuit town of Kuujjuaq, Nunavik.

Photo by the author, 2000.

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Auteur : Scott Heyes
Titre : Protecting the authenticity and integrity of inuksuit within the arctic milieu
Revue : Études/Inuit/Studies, Volume 26, numéro 2, 2002, p. 133-156
URI : http://id.erudit.org/iderudit/007648ar
DOI : 10.7202/007648ar

Tous droits réservés © La revue Études/Inuit/Studies, 2002

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