Editor’s IntroductionIntroduction de l’équipe éditoriale[Record]

With this issue, CuiZine is delighted to showcase work from across the academic spectrum and beyond. In total, this issue comprises ten contributions from ten different backgrounds. Suffice it to say: food unites. This issue includes four research articles, each of which tackles the object of food through a different disciplinary lens. Leila M. Farah’s piece “Meatscapes” offers an innovative way of studying the process of food transformation in the context of early settlement in Montreal. Rather than focusing exclusively on the production of food, i.e. the processing techniques used to transform livestock, she explores how place, space, landscape, architecture and food intersect. Her research has garnered acclaim for its innovative contribution to ‘animating’ the past and for its multidisciplinary, mixed-methods approach. All too often, the significance of mundane objects escapes critical analyses; however, Farah astutely shows how even the most simple of objects—a floor plan, ice houses, animal bones—can contribute to shedding new light on historical food practices. In a similar vein, Alexandra Ketchum’s work on the topic of feminist restaurants and cafés in the 1970s and 1980s shows that almost every aspect of these spaces and the food that was served was intentional, in turn elucidating elements of the dining experience that may have otherwise gone unscrutinised. What may have initially seemed as innocuous was in fact grounded in various tenets of feminist ideologies. For instance, the art on the restaurant or café walls was likely to be on exhibit because of its connection to a female artist or to feminist themes, not solely for the sake of décor or esthetic value. Vegetarian and vegan dishes were not on the menu because of their mainstream appeal exclusively, but rather because these modes of cooking aligned with feminist principles. Ketchum’s holistic analyses of feminist restaurants is revealing of intersectional business models that still have currency today, at a time when many restaurant and food-industry businesses are seeking to be more socially and environmentally responsible. Activist Zoe Matties also addresses the theme of social responsibility in her piece on the subject of food sovereignty and decolonization in Canada. Situating her piece within the larger frameworks of feminist studies and decolonial research, Matties examines alternative food discourses as a means to contest colonial food systems (and colonial systems more broadly) that contribute to food insecurity and health issues within Indigenous populations. Her work is topical and necessary given the fact that, food sovereignty is directly related to self-determination and better healthcare outcomes for these populations. Her proposition to use discomfort as a catalyst for change is also a thought-provoking contribution. Examining how food plays a role in cultural stigmas is an idea Nicolas Fabien-Ouellet addresses in his piece on the popular Québécois dish, poutine. He posits that the ‘Canadization’ of the dish presents a relative threat to the absorption of Québécois culture. That said, despite this more critical analysis, Fabien-Ouellet’s piece also invites the reader to tap into nostalgia: those late nights spent out on the town, when calories didn’t matter and hangovers were fought with gravy and cheese curds. His piece is entertaining as much as it is informative and it will likely leave most readers craving a bite or two of this Québécois staple. As promised in our last issue, we have sought to include more multimedia and creative content. Specifically, in this issue, we have two very engaging creative contributions. The first is Sharon Roseman’s selection of autoethnographic poems that play on the themes of loss and continuity. Her poetry mourns but also celebrates her late mother and late grandmother through memories shared in the kitchen. Her work …