You are on Érudit's new platform. Enjoy! Switch to classic view

Architecture

Magog’s Church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie and the Architectural Dynamics Between Two of Québec’s Founding Institutions During the Twentieth Century: The Roman Catholic Church and the Corporate Industrial Manufactory L’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie de Magog et la dynamique architecturale entre deux institutions fondatrices du Québec au xxe siècle : l’Église catholique et la manufacture industrielle

  • Caroline Beaudoin
Cover of Number 4, 2012, pp. 4-113, Revue de Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec

Article body

1

Joseph-Aimé and Albert Poulin, Plan of the facade of the church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie (Magog), 75 x 55 cm, January 1949, plan 4602, f. 1. BAnQ, Estrie archives centre, Albert Poulin fonds (P7, S1, SS68).

-> See the list of figures

The Québec population’s progressive divorce from the Roman Catholic Church as of the 1960s coincided with a pervasive social revolution that was taking place throughout the Western world at the time. One study concluded that the number of practicing Roman Catholics in the province dropped from 80% in 1960 to 8% in 1996 [1]. Once the province’s sustained wave of rejection subsided, it was left with a daunting number of superfluous churches as parishes either merged or closed due to low attendance, lack of funding, and/or a shortage of active clergy. A renewed collective interest in the buildings emerged once the public realized that many of these churches were being systematically erased from the province’s cultural landscape. The future of these buildings, now nostalgically referred to as the “nation’s castles”, is a concern as they have come to symbolize a large part of the population’s collective identity.

This essay is a qualitative study of Sherbrooke architect Joseph Aimé Poulin’s 1949 design of the church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie located in Magog, Québec (fig. 1). The study proposes that Poulin’s design of the church without ostentatious ornamentation and luxurious materials was a sensitive and meaningful creative choice directed towards the majority of the parish’s French-speaking Roman Catholic factory workers, his clients. The following analysis underscores art historian Dell Upton’s view that “professionally designed structures constitute extraordinary landmarks in a vast expanse of the ordinary [2]”, by emphasizing Poulin’s transparent and sophisticated synthesis between “academic” architectural principles and the “humble” quality of the surrounding ordinary everyday working class environment. Poulin chose an architectural vocabulary familiar to the workers which referenced plain architectonic elements from the very building they worked in: the neighbouring Dominion Textile Company factory, designed by industrial architects T. Pringle & Son Limited and built in 1927 (fig. 2). This study considers how the monumentality of Poulin’s church and its streamlined design respond to the factory both directly and indirectly. By conducting a spatial, visual and material analysis of the church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie in the shadow of the omnipresent factory, the working-class community’s social history emerges with renewed sensitivity and appreciation for the workers’ everyday struggles and collective aspirations.

2

Dominion Textile Company,Magog, P.Q., postcard, Ottawa, Photogelatine Engraving Co., Limited, n. d. BAnQ, heritage collections (CP 6910 CON). Digit.

-> See the list of figures

Industrial Magog

Unlike many of Québec’s young settlements which evolved into Roman Catholic parishes, with the church typically located at the centre of the community, the Township of Magog was first and foremost an industrial town. In 1845, the area’s first textile mill, the Magog Manufacturing Company, opened for business along the Magog River’s banks, an ideal location given the river current’s capacity for generating power. As one of the country’s greatest resources during the early industrial era, particularly in Québec, the rivers were promoted early on by Eastern Township politicians and merchants eager to advance the region’s economic development. In 1881, William Hobbs, Alvin Head Moore and Deputy Charles Carroll Colby secured the waterway rights from the British American Land Company for a period of twenty-five years, on behalf of the renewed Magog Manufacturing Company [3]. The three partners transformed the older company into the Magog Cotton and Print Company, making it “the only calico printing plant in Canada [4]”. It was eventually renamed the Dominion Cotton Mills Company. By 1907, Magog’s factory had “become the largest calico print works on the continent, with the Magog label on fabrics carrying its [n]ame to every corner of the world [5]”.

The City of Magog was thus permanently settled due to its two main waterways: the Magog River and Lake Memphremagog. Clearly, it was the potential for generating hydroelectricity that attracted private investors who sought to exploit the abundant natural resources in industrial towns like Magog, Shawinigan Falls, Riverbend, Témiscaming, and Arvida. In Villes industrielles planifiées, Robert Fortier suggested that Québec’s villes industrielles could be more aptly named villes du pouvoir [6]. During the second wave of industrialization, during the forty-year period between 1891 and 1931, Québec’s population almost doubled, rising from 1.5 to 2.9 million people, and the proportion of urban dwellers in the province rose from 28% to 60% [7]. The towns that emerged during the first wave of industrialization between 1850-1890, such as Magog, were characterized by a spontaneous, organic growth that developed in tandem with the company’s progress. The parish’s financial climate responded to the mill’s cycles of prosperity and decline, as the workers collectively relied on the company for their income. Throughout the years, the population growth in this industrial/residential neighbourhood, historically referred to by local residents as le bas de ville, was also contingent on the mill’s progressive expansion. Historian Gail Cuthbert Brandt’s study “Women in the Quebec Cotton Industry, 1890-1950” investigated the large French Canadian population available for work, describing how the cotton companies in Québec sent recruitment agents into the countryside, using “the Slater or family method […] to persuade entire families to move to the mill centres well into the 1920s [8]”. Brandt’s study indicated that:

Family and kin networks were extremely important […] for the determination of work assignments. Close relatives frequently worked in the same departments because foremen tended to do their hiring on the basis of family connections [9].

Later patriarchal “Company Towns” were much more rigorously structured and systematically planned. Fortier summarized such corporately planned urban settlements as follows:

Ces villes ont été des laboratoires sociaux et urbanistiques ; elles ont remplacé la structure sociale pluraliste de la ville traditionnelle par un ordre simplifié, basé sur l’occupation de l’employé et les rapports de classes engendrées par la production industrielle. Leur conception tend à créer un environnement rationalisé en vue d’atteindre une forme poussée de contrôle social, les compagnies régentant l’aménagement et la gestion de ces villes avec la même pugnacité qu’elles appliquent à la conquête d’un marché […] la ville sert de modèle, elle devient une vitrine ou l’entreprise expose ses réalisations comme autant de trophées [10].

While Canada’s wealthy Anglophone industrialists were developing the nation’s financial empires, Québec’s dominantly Francophone Roman Catholic Church was actively spreading its spiritual and social influence throughout the province. Fortier underscored the dynamic between the two institutions by identifying a direct dichotomy underlying the Church and Industry:

[La] disposition de l’église en face de l’usine prendra une importance majeure dans les villes de compagnies du Québec, ou [sic] elle atteste d’une certaine manière la dualité patronat anglophone et protestant / ouvriers francophones et catholiques [11].

Significantly, Poulin’s church plans for the parish of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie, relative to its original chapel, rotated the entrance’s orientation so that it would no longer be perpendicular to the factory, aligning it instead with the factory to within a few degrees, shifting the entrance to Rue Saint-David, in order to be prominently viewed from Saint-Patrice Est, paralleling Rue Principale and the imposing Dominion Textile’s facility (fig. 3). As a result, the church was physically and symbolically less subordinate to the factory since it occupied a central position in its own right on one of the city’s main east/west arteries. This re-orientation thus enabled the workers to approach their church without having to first confront their workplace in order to do so.

3

The city plan has been rotated 180° for the purposes of illustration.

From left to right:

Underwriters’ Survey Bureau, Insurance Plan of the City of Magog, Que., Toronto / Montréal: The Bureau, 1951, detail. BAnQ, heritage collections (G/3454/M341G475/ 1951/U53 CAR). Digit.

Joseph-Aimé and Albert Poulin, Plan of the site of the new church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie (Magog), 55 x 75 cm, March 2, 1949, plan 4602, f. 1. BAnQ, Estrie archives centre, Albert Poulin fonds (P7, S1, SS68).

-> See the list of figures

Magog’s Second Roman Catholic Parish

Sainte-Marguerite-Marie was Magog’s second Roman Catholic parish founded in 1921 in the vicinity of the factory which had become a branch of the Dominion Textile Company Limited as of 1905. The workers were motivated to have their own church and parish closer to their homes rather than having to climb the hill to celebrate mass at Saint-Patrice, Magog’s first parish founded in 1872. In a letter dated May 21, 1921 in response to the request put forward by the lower-income residents to establish their own parish, Curé Brassard from Saint-Patrice explained to Monseigneur Lefebvre from the Sherbrooke diocese:

Le temps n’est pas arrivé encore de faire cette division ; on ne peut raisonnablement localiser la place de la nouvelle église. La manufacture bâtira avant longtemps une [sic] agrandissement considérable et ce sera probablement de l’autre côté de la rivière et alors il sera facile de trouver un endroit salubre et convenable [12].

Despite the priest’s objections, Sainte-Marguerite-Marie was canonically ordained by Bishop Larocque on September 15, 1921 [13]. The church wardens, with unanimous support from the parish residents, were authorized to borrow the necessary funds to purchase the land in order to build a temporary chapel “pouvant contenir au moins six ou sept cents sièges et coûter approximativement la somme de huit milles piastres [14]”, subject to Monseigneur Larocque’s approval. The original clapboard chapel was quickly erected by the residents in time to celebrate midnight mass on December 25, 1921 (fig. 4). The fact that the parish considered the chapel temporary suggests that it had grander intentions for its place of worship from the beginning, attesting to the parishioners’ ambition, patience, and willingness to wait until it became financially feasible to construct a more permanent structure. Impeded as the parish was by limited financial resources, it is unsurprising that the “temporary” chapel served for 29 years. In a letter written by Curé Fraser regarding the collection of tithes [15], the priest described the young parish’s difficulties, emphasizing how the majority of the residents, as factory workers, were tenants and not home owners, and to a large extent transient:

Il faut nécessairement tenir compte que, étant une population flottante, le gros tiers ne paie rien soit pour cause de pauvreté ou n’étant ici souvent que quelques mois ; ils partent souvent sans même qu’on les connaisse [16].

4

The church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie (Magog), 1910. BAnQ, Montréal archives centre, Félix Barrière collection (P748, S1, P1330). Photo: Félix Barrière.

-> See the list of figures

The devoted parishioners hired a young architect named Joseph Aimé Poulin to design a new presbytery to comfortably and adequately accommodate its priests in 1927 (fig. 5). Poulin therefore established an early relationship with the parish founders as they undoubtedly outlined their intentions and aspirations for the future of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie. Although the building was designed in 1927, construction was delayed until 1929 due to financial limitations. The cost of the tan brick presbytery was estimated at $29, 111.97 [17], an impressive sum reflective of the high quality design and materials desired by the generous workers, deemed worthy to house their esteemed clergy. The luxurious three-storey structure featured, amongst other things, a separate dining room, seven bedrooms, three studies, three bathrooms, a wrap-around covered porch, a solarium, and a smoke den. An uncompromising precedent was thus established by the parish to spare no expense in obtaining excellent craftsmanship and enduring materials for its religious architecture.

5

Joseph-Aimé Poulin, Plan of the facade of the Sainte-Marguerite- Marie rectory (West side), 48 x 60 cm, December 10, 1927. BAnQ, Estrie archives centre, Albert Poulin fonds (P7, S1, SS41).

Photos : Marie-Andrée Boivin © Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, 2012

-> See the list of figures

An Extra-Ordinary Church

On February 4, 1945, “M. le curé soit autorisé à demander l’architecte Poulin, Aimé, de commencer les plans de la nouvelle église [18]”. Once again burdened by financial limitations, the working class parish had to delay construction until 1949 due to reservations raised by the cautious workers. In a letter to Monseigneur Desranleau from Curé Vel, the priest explained:

Devant le cout [sic] élevé de la construction, les anciens et la plupart des jeunes m’ont conseillé de retarder pour attendre une baisse dans les prix des matériaux. Je les ai félicités de leur prudence [19].

Work on the new church was postponed until March 26, 1949, following an ambitious and sustained fundraising campaign undertaken by the parish. It is located at 340 Saint-Patrice Est in Magog, Québec. The building is situated on a lot that occupies a city block situated a mere 180 meters from what was once the Dominion Textile Company factory (see figure 3, p. 48).

The church’s striking design and relative monumentality are particularly intriguing due to its location in this industrial/residential neighbourhood. The community is routinely overlooked by the city’s large tourist population and generally bypassed by local residents, rendering the area undeservedly marginalized despite its historical significance to the rest of the city, and perhaps the entire region as well. Yet the church’s 127-foot symmetrical bell towers, visible from various vantage points, are proudly inserted into Magog’s everyday landscape, defiantly calling attention to its historical origins. The building’s geometric and dignified facade reassuringly conveys a sense of accessibility and stability to the area (see figure 1, p. 46).

By the mid 1940s, Sainte-Marguerite-Marie’s church and factory were undeclared allies at times and adversaries at others, who seemingly managed to agree as often as they disagreed about their unspoken and unofficially created social spectrum. The two forces inadvertently formed a socio-institutional relationship cemented by their aversion to the post-war threat of communism, their efforts to modernize, and their mutual interest in the workers’ everyday lives, which perpetuated an ambiguous dynamic between the two institutions. This circuitous dynamic was characterized by shifting policies and loyalties motivated by the mutual objective of maintaining authority over the workers in particular, and an indiscriminate perception of good social order overall. For example, in 1900 the mill called upon the city’s only Roman Catholic priest to intervene when 400 workers spontaneously went on strike for the first time in Magog [20]. A meeting was promptly held in Saint-Patrice’s presbytery, at which point the workers declared “qu’ils sont capables de se gouverner seuls [21]”, rejecting what they perceived as the priest’s overzealous interventions. During another strike, in 1909, it was reported that “le curé Brassard de Magog prend une attitude franchement hostile aux grévistes [22]”. Despite this initial schism between the clergy and workers, the Confédération des travailleurs catholiques du Canada (CTCC) was eventually founded in 1921 [23]. The moderate union “puisait son inspiration dans la doctrine sociale de l’Église [24]”. Due to the Church’s support for the union, which became the Syndicat catholique des ouvriers du textile de Magog in 1935 [25], “le mouvement ouvrier était maintenant perçu par la communauté comme un partenaire social respecté et un moyen de défense légitime pour les travailleurs [26]”. However, the Dominion Textile Company made its position clear by publicly announcing in the local newspaper that although “il préférait les syndicats catholiques aux centrales américaines […] elle n’avait aucune intention de laisser un tiers intervenir entre elle et sa main-d’oeuvre [27]”.

Influences on Québec’s Religious Architecture

A Roman Catholic liturgy reform movement, originating in Germany during the 1930s, challenged architects to invent ways to seat worshippers closer to the altar in order to enhance their participation in the Eucharistic celebration [28]. The movement was eventually officially sanctioned by Pope Pius XII in 1947 who encouraged “la participation active des fidèles au sacrifice eucharistique, en union étroite avec le prêtre [29]”. He urged bishops throughout the world to establish the necessary means within their respective diocese to facilitate the mutual participation of the congregation and priest during the celebration of holy communion [30]. Throughout this transitional period there were two influential groups within the Church: those who supported to ideology of L’Art d’église and those who supported that of L’Art sacré. Although both journals, published in France, called for a renewed religious architecture, L’Art sacré was the more progressive of the two, expressing a somewhat more radical view [31].

L’Art d’église was founded in 1927. Its goal was to move the Church in new architectural directions while aligning it with Academy principles and traditions. The publication’s director argued that modern architecture’s three fundamental mistakes were its subjectivity, its arbitrary symbolism, and its functionality [32]. Significantly, those same three “fundamental mistakes” are present in Poulin’s plans for Sainte-Marguerite-Marie. The journal viewed form and function as incompatible. Its underlying opinion was that a church’s architectural form was the architect’s domain, but its function as a holy place was inseparable from the sacred nature of the Roman Catholic Church, thus beyond any architect’s authority [33].

L’Art sacré was first printed in 1935. Maurice Denis, the journal’s founder, called for “the use of modern materials, especially concrete: rational construction: and simple decoration eschewing three-dimensional illusion [34]”. Both journals endorsed modernity, although Denis’ advocated an architectural functionality which was opposed by L’Art d’église. The directors of L’Art sacré preferred simplicity over ostentation, favouring churches such as Sainte-Marguerite-Marie which resonated with their communities, rather than those which represented elaborate and luxurious Houses of the Lord:

[L’église] doit avoir un caractère sacré qui la distingue des autres édifices. Mais il ne faut pas que cette distinction la fasse paraître plus importante que l’usine ou le cinéma, ni qu’elle lui confère un rôle dominant par rapport à eux [35].

Churches gradually shifted from representing the Houses of the Lord to becoming the houses of the people of the Lord [36]. Poulin’s design was simultaneously particular and personal to the workers. He qualified it as unique, declaring “la paroisse Sainte-Marguerite-Marie peut se dire qu’elle possède un temple dont il n’existe nul [sic] part ailleurs de modèle [37]”. His plans clearly manifest what the editors of L’Art sacré advocated in order to move the Roman Catholic Church’s architecture in new directions.

Poulin’s Progressive and Innovative Design Features

The church’s orthogonal lines enable the structure to seamlessly insert itself into the urban environment. Its irregular design integrates well into the rest of the parish’s erratic urban development, which began in the early nineteenth century. The presbytery’s annexation to the church reiterates the company’s practice of gradual growth by adding building upon building to the expanding plant. Poulin’s plans also reflect an optimistic and experimental post-war architectural tendency to embrace modernity. As a mature and prolific professional, Poulin clearly exercised an innovative and progressive approach to his work on Sainte-Marguerite-Marie. He confirmed “nul doute, cet édifice est comme un essai entièrement nouveau pour appliquer les principes de l’architecture moderne à la construction des églises [38]”. His plans also manifest an overall intuitive appreciation for the factory’s significance to le bas de ville’s working class parish and history.

Relative to Poulin’s other church designs at that time, it is beyond mere coincidence that Sainte-Marguerite-Marie’s rectilinear geometric shape references the factory’s shape most strikingly through its flattened roof, and insistently horizontal, dense structural mass relieved by regular vertical rhythms. His paired bell towers echo the factory’s two sets of towers (fig. 6). Bergeron confirmed that “il n’existe pas dans l’architecture d’après-guerre d’autres églises à façades symétriques dominées par deux clochers monumentaux [39]”. This suggests that Poulin deliberately deviated from established architectural practices in order to quote existing architectural elements from the neighbouring factory.

6

Interprovincial Airways Ltd., Magog River, Dominion Textile Co. dam […], December 20, 1929, detail. BAnQ, Québec City archives centre, Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Faune fonds (E57, S44, SS1, PY-244). Photographer not identified. Digit.

-> See the list of figures

The church is constructed of reinforced concrete clad with quarry-faced granite stone slabs from Trois-Rivières, cut to measure on site. All openings are trimmed with contrasting smooth granite stones, including the doorways. All doorways and entrances are rectilinear, right angles with no arches present anywhere in or on the building [40], similar to the factory. Polished stones were used as decorative details by creating a textural contrast to the rougher surface of the building blocks, establishing a dominantly monochrome exterior in keeping with the factory’s predominantly monochrome red brick structures. Poulin’s use of contrasting polished or alternating patterns of polished/rough stone bands to relieve the exterior’s monotonous surface recalls T. Pringle & Son’s use of contrasting horizontal concrete strips, both colorwise and texturally, to offset the prevalent red brickwork (fig. 7). Where the church’s exterior surface corresponds to the sub-basement, larger blocks of stone were used. The subsequent higher rows maintain a shorter and narrower stretch of stone laid in a sequence similar to the factory’s brickwork.

7

From left to right:

Exterior view of the Memphrémagog municipal library (formerly the church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie in Magog), January 26, 2012.

Exterior view of the former Dominion Textile plant in Magog, January 26, 2012. Photo: Caroline Beaudoin.

-> See the list of figures

The two buildings incorporate pilasters at regular intervals, creating a general sense of symmetry informing the structures’ east and west elevations. Their repetitive rhythm establishes lateral movement while inserting an alternate vertical direction, which lends a sense of balance to the substantial and imposing walls. Each building contrasts the pilaster tips, drawing attention upward, accentuating the composition’s secondary and subordinate vertical orientation. Poulin placed a single uniform lozenge between each pair of pilasters and capped them with a pediment, pointing heavenward. The intervals between the pilasters dictate the fenestration’s regular, homogeneous and symmetrical placement while challenging the walls’ lateral emphasis. The lower and mid-level windows are primarily vertically oriented which reinforces the pilasters resistance to the buildings’ dominant horizontal form. The factory’s upper level horizontal ribbon windows add variety and contrast to the vertical fenestration while giving an enhanced sense of lightness to the structure as it approaches the flat roof. Poulin borrowed the uppermost delicate square cavities found on his plans directly from the factory where they are used purely decoratively, arranged in precise lozenges that separate the upper and mid-level windows. He rotated the cavities horizontally, echoing the factory’s ribbon windows, and placed them in linear series of threes. The architect’s repetitive use of trios symbolically references the Christian trinity, a recurring theme he used throughout the church’s design. In doing so, he endorsed L’Art sacré’s conviction that the church should have “un caractère sacré qui la distingue des autres édifices [41]” without making it necessarily appear more important than the surrounding buildings. The front steps leading to the church’s geometric portal are laid out in a fan-like shape extending beyond the width of the façade, providing a wide and open access to the church’s entrance, embracing the Roman Catholic Church’s renewed image as a welcoming House of the People of the Lord.

The exterior decorative elements are clearly subordinate to the building’s construction, adhering to the theories advocated by rationalists. The façades of the church and factory are distinguished by strikingly similar understated rectilinear false pediments that rise slightly above the flat roof tops, centering the buildings while offering subtle ornamentation without function (fig. 8). The symmetrical bell towers on each side of the church’s frontispiece are decidedly the most traditional elements of Poulin’s design. The imposing tall towers act as beacons for the working-class parish, visible throughout the city’s more affluent communities to the west and north. The copper louvered towers are the most ornately and densely decorated exterior features. The inverted chevron motif retraces the outline of an equilateral triangle, while pointing skyward with arrowhead precision towards what Poulin described as the au-delà. According to Richard Taylor, equilateral triangles are “one of the oldest Christian symbols, the equality of the sides of the angles expressing the equality of the Persons of the Trinity [42]”. The architect repeats the pattern at the tips of the exterior’s pilasters and on the interior’s stylized crushed marble terrazzo floors, directing attention towards the altar and tabernacle, two of the church’s holiest vessels. Taylor asserted that “in a number of senses, and to different degrees, churches were built to be read [43]”. Similarly, in The Meaning of the Built Environment, Amos Rapoport explained “if the design of the environment is seen partly as a process of encoding information, then the users can be seen as decoding it. If the code is not shared or understood, the environment does not communicate [44]”. Based on these premises, Poulin’s use of repetition can be interpreted as a strategy to communicate with the workers, as routine and repetitive cycles were familiar everyday patterns within their factory work environment. Furthermore, Rapoport argued “by increasing redundancy, the likelihood of messages and meanings getting through is greatly increased [45]”.

8

From left to right:

View of the facade of the former Dominion Textile plant in Magog, 2012. Photo: Caroline Beaudoin.

View of the facade of the Memphrémagog municipal library (formerly the church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie in Magog), February 26, 2012. Photo: Caroline Beaudoin.

-> See the list of figures

The modern interior’s overwhelming simplicity and use of repetition throughout is consistent (fig. 9). All windows on the main floor are part of a stained glass series of identically fabricated daisies [46], one of Québec’s naturalized “common” field flowers, sharing the church’s patron saint’s namesake marguerite in French. The daisy is further repeated throughout the interior, for example on the marble terrazzo floor and on the strips of moulding decorating the ceiling and walls. The flat plaster ceiling and uniform plaster walls for the nave and chancel were a modern treatment for the period, strategically intended to diminish the distinction between the two spaces by using the same materials, monotone colours, and lighting of equal intensity. Box beams and columns are spaced on the ceiling and walls at regular intervals, showcasing the interior’s original minimalist décor. Identically patterned wooden moulding bands were used to decorate the chancel’s cherry wood furnishings and trim the nave and chancel’s upper dados while establishing continuity, further minimizing the distinction between the two spaces. The same patterned moulding was further used to trim the gallery’s ledge and to frame the upper doorways.

9

Magog [church of Sainte-Marguerite- Marie, interior], 1951. BAnQ, Montréal archives centre, Ministère de la Culture, des Communications et de la Condition féminine fonds (E6, S7, SS1, D52791-51). Photo: Joseph Guibord. Digit.

-> See the list of figures

The structure is a two-storied building. The upper level’s single nave is shorter and much wider than traditional designs, intended to seat the congregation closer to the altar. The nave’s floor gently slopes down towards the altar. The slope was considered a highly innovative way to encourage and facilitate the congregation’s approach to the sanctuary as advocated by the liturgical reform. The lower level provided a theatre, also featuring a downward sloping floor towards the stage, complete with a ticket office [47].

Poulin’s large basement community hall was a modern and desirable quality for advocates of L’Art sacré. The journal promoted the parish’s involvement with the Church as a collective Christian body in practice through architectural innovations. Poulin described the importance of Sainte-Marguerite’s basement to the parish:

L’église proprement dite s’élève au-dessus d’un vaste soubassement, bien éclairé ; on aperçoit les entrées de la salle paroissiale, élément devenu presque indispensable dans tous nos programmes d’église, et faisant de celle-ci un centre social en même temps qu’un lieu de prière [48].

Between Tradition and Modernity

Bergeron argued “Sainte-Marguerite-Marie exprime fort bien un curieux paradoxe: elle se démarque au moment de sa construction par des innovations, mais demeure éminemment classique dans sa composition [49]”. Peter Collins defended modern architecture’s banality, decades ago, in terms of its meaning “common to all”, arguing that an architect succeeds when disciplining “their architectural forms to harmonize with earlier forms without sacrificing any of the principles of the modern age [50]”. Poulin’s church appears older than it actually is precisely because he harmonized his design with the area’s existing forms, including the long-established factory and early homes in the area. Bergeron situated Sainte-Marguerite’s architecture somewhere between modernity and tradition. I concur, noting that the architect’s extraordinary church design simultaneously recalled the parish’s inaugural origins in 1921, while responding to its imposing and authoritative neighbour, the progressively evolving factory. Had Poulin designed a smaller-scaled, more humble church in keeping with the diocesan trends of the time, justice would not have been done to the parish’s historical significance either to the city at large or to the social position of the Roman Catholic Church in the face of the Dominion Textile Company’s imposing facility. Poulin knowingly and deliberately designed the church to appear older than its time in order to position the parish’s historical rank relative to Magog’s other two Roman Catholic parishes: the oldest, Saint-Patrice founded in 1894, and the youngest Saint-Jean-Bosco founded in 1945 (fig. 10).

10

From left to right:

Magog [church of Saint-Patrice], 1951. BAnQ, Montréal archives centre, Ministère de la Culture, des Communications et de la Condition féminine fonds (E6, S7, SS1, D52789-51). Digit.

Magog [church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie, exterior], 1951. BAnQ, Montréal archives centre, Ministère de la Culture, des Communications et de la Condition féminine fonds (E6, S7, SS1, D52790-51). Digit.

Magog [church of Saint-Jean-Bosco], 1951. BAnQ, Montréal archives centre, Ministère de la Culture, des Commu-nications et de la Condition féminine fonds (E6, S7, SS1, D52792-51). Digit.

Photos: Joseph Guibord.

-> See the list of figures

***

During the early 1940s, the majority of the factory’s workforce not only worked at the factory, they also lived in its mammoth shadow. Poulin created a church that would resonate with the workers’ daily lives while attesting to the significant role they played within the community by designing a building commissioned by the working-class parish, a temple worthy of their contribution to the community and the City of Magog at large. If the church appears older than its time, this is a tribute to the parish founders and an acknowledgement of the community’s history. A modern structure such as Saint-Jean-Bosco would appear out of place in an area with origins dating back to the 19th century. Poulin cleverly designed a church using modern innovations and technology, paralleling the factory’s industrial progression, using quality and enduring materials as an authoritative response to its imposing neighbour, the factory. The workers were well accustomed to technological innovations as the factory regularly modernized its facilities and machinery. Thus, the church was essentially keeping stride with the post-war current without neglecting the parish’s past. This unique architectural specimen represents a link between modernity and tradition, built for endurance. The extraordinary design demonstrates that the parishioners took pride in their community and were motivated to assert their position within the City of Magog’s greater urban plan, earning it the following high praise “Sainte-Marguerite-Marie se démarque sur le plan régional autant que national [51]”. Bergeron added, “Une église aussi imposante et d’une aussi grande qualité située au coeur d’un quartier ouvrier a une valeur de représentativité élevée [52]”.

Poulin’s design represents “the idea that buildings communicate to their users within an everyday universe of commonly-held ideas [53]”. Had the determined workers settled for a less monumental and high quality structure their legacy might, in recent years, have been slated for permanent erasure from the City of Magog’s urban landscape. Poulin challenged the hierarchical division between the parish’s two authorities by subtly incorporating architectural elements from the factory into his church design. The spirit of modernity arises from breaking with traditional hierarchical limitations and oppression. Poulin’s rectilinear design challenged the traditional hierarchies of religious architecture by favouring a relatively uniform overall organization and treatment. His plans lightened the Church’s authority symbolically and rationally by physically and intellectually enhancing its accessibility through simplicity, describing his design’s fundamental quality as:

La simplicité, l’unité et la clarté sont les caractères principaux qui font de cette église un lieu de paix et de prière […] La décoration de l’église est aussi toute simple. Le principal motif représente une marguerite, une humble fleur des champs [54].

Although it remains debatable as to whether or not, as Curé Vel proclaimed in 1949, “la future église de Sainte-Marguerite sera belle à voir [55]”, one thing is compellingly clear. The church is still today, as it has been since its completion in 1950, an artefact that incontestably embodies modernity’s quest for identifying something extraordinary in the ordinary. It is a magnificent legacy left to the city and future generations by the workers in recognition of their collective everyday lives and struggles. It is a tribute to the architect for recognizing and dignifying this often marginalized yet culturally invaluable class within Québec’s social history, its cultural identity.

The completion of the church marked the workers’ definitive moment of affirming their identity within the city’s landscape. Sainte-Marguerite-Marie’s construction represented the workers’ collective contribution to the area while challenging the factory’s omnipresent monopoly by erecting their own adjacent monumental structure. The factory was owned by distant company shareholders while the Church of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie belonged to the very present workers. Today the municipal library, which was once a parish church, through its design, scale and regional materials has become a monument to the workers who not only settled the community, but contributed to the city’s industrial success, its development. Poulin was familiar with the parish. He was aware of the factory’s influence over the workers’ everyday lives. He subsequently designed a place of worship that was simultaneously meaningful to their factory lives, yet distinctly separate from and beyond it, successfully creating a unique specimen of religious architecture with one eye looking towards modernity and the other winking at the past. The building stands as a testament to the significant historical contributions of an often overlooked social class whose hard, tedious labour, social commitment and values have greatly shaped Québec’s current heritage and contemporary cultural landscape.

Le divorce progressif entre la population québécoise et l’Église catholique à compter des années 1960 coïncide avec une révolution sociale généralisée dans le monde occidental à la même époque. D’après une étude, le nombre de catholiques pratiquants au Québec est passé de 80 % en 1960 à 8 % en 1996 [1]. Une fois retombée cette écrasante vague de rejet, le nombre d’églises superflues s’avère impressionnant, conséquence des fusions ou des fermetures de paroisses victimes de faible fréquentation, de financement déficient ou de pénurie de membres actifs du clergé. La disparition systématique d’un grand nombre de ces églises du paysage culturel suscite un intérêt collectif renouvelé pour ces édifices au sein du public québécois. L’avenir de ces bâtiments, maintenant appelés avec nostalgie « châteaux forts de la nation », est préoccupant, car ils symbolisent désormais une grande part de l’identité collective de la population.

Cet article est une étude qualitative portant sur la conception, en 1949, de l’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie de Magog (ill. 1, p. 46) par l’architecte sherbrookois Joseph Aimé Poulin. Nous y avançons que Poulin a fait preuve de créativité et de bon sens en dessinant une église dépourvue d’ornementation ostentatoire et de matériaux luxueux à l’intention de ses clients, des ouvriers d’usine majoritairement francophones et catholiques. Notre analyse souligne l’opinion de l’historien de l’art Dell Upton voulant que les structures conçues professionnellement constituent des monuments extraordinaires dans une vaste étendue ordinaire [2] et met l’accent sur la synthèse à la fois limpide et subtile réalisée par Poulin, qui a su lier les principes architecturaux « académiques » et l’« humble » qualité du milieu et de la vie quotidienne des ouvriers. En effet, Poulin a choisi un vocabulaire architectural familier qui empruntait certains éléments architecturaux banals de l’édifice où les ouvriers travaillaient, soit l’usine voisine de la Dominion Textile Company, conçue par les architectes industriels T. Pringle & Son Limited et construite en 1927 (ill. 2, p. 47). Cet article démontre comment la monumentalité et le plan simplifié de l’église de Poulin dialoguent avec l’usine sur un ton à la fois direct et indirect. Grâce à une analyse spatiale, visuelle et matérielle de l’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie, érigée à l’ombre de cette usine omniprésente, l’histoire sociale de cette communauté ouvrière émerge avec une compréhension renouvelée et plus sensible des luttes quotidiennes et des aspirations collectives des travailleurs.

Magog, ville industrielle

Contrairement à de nombreux jeunes peuplements devenus des paroisses catholiques où l’église se dressait généralement au centre de la communauté, le canton de Magog était d’abord et avant tout une ville industrielle. En 1845, la Magog Manufacturing Company, première filature de la région, amorce sa production sur les rives de la rivière Magog, un emplacement idéal compte tenu du potentiel énergétique de ce cours d’eau. Au début de l’ère industrielle, les rivières comptent parmi les plus grandes ressources du pays, surtout au Québec. Impatients de faire progresser le développement économique des Cantons-de-l’Est, les politiciens et les commerçants de la région prennent donc très tôt des mesures en faveur de l’exploitation des cours d’eau. En 1881, William Hobbs, Alvin Head Moore et le député Charles Carroll Colby obtiennent de la British American Land Company les droits d’exploitation de la rivière Magog pour une période de 25 ans au nom de l’entreprise qui succède à la Magog Manufacturing Company [3]. Les trois partenaires l’ont en effet rebaptisée Magog Cotton and Print Company, ce qui en fait du coup la seule usine de calicot imprimé au Canada [4]. Elle recevra au bout du compte le nom de Dominion Cotton Mills Company. En 1907, l’usine de Magog devient la manufacture de calicot imprimé la plus importante du continent, et l’étiquette de Magog sur les tissus fait connaître ce nom dans le monde entier [5].

La ville de Magog s’établit donc de manière permanente grâce à ses deux principales voies navigables : la rivière Magog et le lac Memphrémagog. C’est de toute évidence le potentiel hydroélectrique qui attire les investisseurs privés désireux d’exploiter les abondantes ressources naturelles de cités industrielles comme Magog, Shawinigan Falls, Riverbend, Témiscaming et Arvida. Dans Villes industrielles planifiées, Robert Fortier soutient qu’il serait plus juste de qualifier les villes industrielles du Québec de « villes du pouvoir [6] ». Au cours de la deuxième vague d’industrialisation, entre 1891 et 1931, la population du Québec double presque, passant de 1,5 à 2,9 millions d’habitants, et la proportion de citadins y passe de 28 % à 60 % [7]. Les villes comme Magog, qui ont vu le jour pendant la première vague d’industrialisation, de 1850 à 1890, sont caractérisées par une croissance naturelle spontanée qui se produit parallèlement à l’expansion des entreprises. Le climat financier de cette paroisse est tributaire des cycles de prospérité et de récession de la filature, car les ouvriers dépendent tous de la compagnie pour leurs revenus. Au fil des ans, la croissance de la population dans ce quartier à la fois industriel et résidentiel, traditionnellement appelé « le bas de ville » par les résidents locaux, est elle aussi liée à l’expansion progressive de la filature. L’étude de l’historienne Gail Cuthbert Brandt intitulée « Women in the Quebec Cotton Industry, 1890-1950 » analyse le vaste bassin de main-d’oeuvre canadienne-française apte au travail et décrit comment les propriétaires de filatures de coton, au Québec, dépêchaient des agents de recrutement dans les campagnes. Ils utilisaient « la méthode Slater, ou dite “de famille” […], pour convaincre des familles entières de déménager dans les villes où se trouvait une filature, et ce, jusque vers la fin des années 1920 [8] ». Cette étude indique aussi ceci :

Les réseaux familiaux et parentaux étaient extrêmement importants […] en ce qui concerne l’attribution des tâches. De proches parents travaillaient fréquemment dans les mêmes secteurs parce que les contremaîtres avaient l’habitude d’embaucher sur la foi des liens familiaux [9].

Par la suite, la structure des villes de compagnies patriarcales devient beaucoup plus rigoureuse et l’aménagement plus systématique. Robert Fortier résume comme suit l’aménagement par les entreprises des peuplements urbains :

Ces villes ont été des laboratoires sociaux et urbanistiques ; elles ont remplacé la structure sociale pluraliste de la ville traditionnelle par un ordre simplifié, basé sur l’occupation de l’employé et les rapports de classes engendrées par la production industrielle. Leur conception tend à créer un environnement rationalisé en vue d’atteindre une forme poussée de contrôle social, les compagnies régentant l’aménagement et la gestion de ces villes avec la même pugnacité qu’elles appliquent à la conquête d’un marché […], la ville sert de modèle, elle devient une vitrine où l’entreprise expose ses réalisations comme autant de trophées [10].

Tandis que les riches industriels anglophones bâtissent les empires financiers du pays, l’Église catholique québécoise, majoritairement francophone, étend activement son influence sociale et spirituelle sur tout le territoire. Robert Fortier met en lumière la dynamique entre l’Église et l’industrie en soulignant une dichotomie directe sur laquelle celle-ci repose :

[La] disposition de l’église en face de l’usine prendra une importance majeure dans les villes de compagnies du Québec, ou [sic] elle atteste d’une certaine manière la dualité patronat anglophone et protestant / ouvriers francophones et catholiques [11].

Élément révélateur, les plans dressés par Poulin pour l’église de la paroisse Sainte-Marguerite-Marie de Magog montrent qu’il l’a orientée afin qu’elle ne soit plus perpendiculaire – comme l’était la chapelle – mais presque parallèle à l’usine, à quelques degrés près. L’entrée est ainsi déplacée pour donner sur la rue Saint-David afin d’être bien visible de la rue Saint-Patrice Est, parallèlement à la rue Principale et aux imposantes installations de la Dominion Textile (ill. 3, p. 48). En conséquence, l’église n’a plus à s’effacer, physiquement et symboliquement, devant l’usine : elle occupe une place centrale sur l’une des principales artères est-ouest de la ville. Cette réorientation permet ainsi aux ouvriers de se diriger vers leur église sans devoir d’abord passer devant leur lieu de travail.

La deuxième paroisse catholique de Magog

Fondée en 1921 à proximité de l’usine devenue une filiale de la Dominion Textile Company Limited dès 1905, Sainte-Marguerite-Marie est la deuxième paroisse catholique de Magog. Lassés de devoir gravir une colline pour assister à la messe à la paroisse Saint-Patrice, la première de Magog, fondée en 1872, certains ouvriers expriment le souhait d’avoir une église et une paroisse bien à eux, à proximité de leur domicile. Dans une lettre datée du 2 mai 1921 en réponse à une demande de citoyens de condition modeste concernant la fondation de leur propre paroisse, le curé Brassard, de la paroisse Saint-Patrice, explique ce qui suit à Monseigneur Lefebvre, du diocèse de Sherbrooke :

Le temps n’est pas arrivé encore de faire cette division ; on ne peut raisonnablement localiser la place de la nouvelle église. La manufacture bâtira avant longtemps une [sic] agrandissement considérable et ce sera probablement de l’autre côté de la rivière et alors il sera facile de trouver un endroit salubre et convenable [12].

En dépit des objections du prêtre, la paroisse Sainte-Marguerite-Marie est consacrée le 15 septembre 1921[13] par un évêque, Monseigneur Larocque, conformément aux canons de l’Église. Unanimement soutenus par les paroissiens, les marguilliers obtiennent l’autorisation d’emprunter les fonds nécessaires pour acquérir le terrain et y construire une chapelle temporaire « pouvant contenir au moins six ou sept cents sièges et coûter approximativement la somme de huit milles piastres [14] », sous réserve de l’approbation de Monseigneur Larocque. La chapelle d’origine en bardeau est rapidement érigée par la population, juste à temps pour y célébrer la messe de minuit le 25 décembre 1921 (ill. 4, p. 50). Le fait qu’on estime dès le départ que cette chapelle sera temporaire laisse supposer de plus grandes visées pour ce lieu de culte. Celles-ci témoignent de l’ambition, de la patience et de la volonté des paroissiens d’attendre qu’il soit financièrement possible de construire une structure plus durable. Toutefois, compte tenu des ressources financières limitées qui freinent la paroisse, la chapelle « temporaire » servira 29 ans. Dans une lettre à propos de la collecte de la dîme [15], le curé Fraser décrit les difficultés de la jeune paroisse et met l’accent sur le fait que la majorité des habitants, ouvriers d’usine, sont locataires plutôt que propriétaires et en grande partie gens de passage :

Il faut nécessairement tenir compte que, étant une population flottante, le gros tiers ne paie rien soit pour cause de pauvreté ou n’étant ici souvent que quelques mois ; ils partent souvent sans même qu’on les connaisse [16].

En 1927, les paroissiens engagent un jeune architecte nommé Joseph Aimé Poulin pour concevoir un nouveau presbytère où les prêtres seraient logés de manière convenable et confortable (ill. 5, p. 51). Des liens se tissent donc très tôt entre Poulin et les fondateurs de la paroisse Sainte-Marguerite-Marie au moment où ceux-ci tracent certainement les grandes lignes de leurs aspirations pour l’avenir de leur paroisse. Le plan de l’édifice est réalisé en 1927 et, pourtant, la construction est retardée jusqu’en 1929 en raison de contraintes financières. Le coût du presbytère en brique brun clair est estimé à 29 111,97 $ [17], une somme impressionnante qui reflète la conception et les matériaux de grande qualité souhaités par les généreux ouvriers, parce qu’ils les jugent dignes de leur très estimé clergé. La luxueuse structure de trois étages compte, entre autres caractéristiques, une salle à manger indépendante, sept chambres à coucher, trois salles de bain, une véranda couverte qui fait le tour du bâtiment, un solarium et un fumoir. La paroisse établit donc un audacieux précédent en ne reculant pas devant la dépense pour obtenir le travail d’excellents artisans ainsi que des matériaux durables pour son architecture religieuse.

Une église extraordinaire

Le 4 février 1945, on demande que « M. le curé soit autorisé à demander l’architecte Poulin, Aimé, de commencer les plans de la nouvelle église [18] ». De nouveau accablée par les restrictions financières, la paroisse ouvrière doit repousser la construction à 1949 en raison des réserves exprimées par des travailleurs prudents. Le curé Vel explique la situation dans une lettre adressée à Monseigneur Desranleau :

Devant le cout [sic] élevé de la construction, les anciens et la plupart des jeunes m’ont conseillé de retarder pour attendre une baisse dans les prix des matériaux. Je les ai félicités de leur prudence [19].

La paroisse mène une longue et ambitieuse campagne de financement, mais le chantier de la nouvelle église est interrompu jusqu’au 26 mars 1949. L’église est sise au 340 de la rue Saint-Patrice Est, à Magog, sur un terrain qui occupe un pâté de maisons situé à proximité (à peine 180 mètres) de ce qui fut autrefois l’usine de la Dominion Textile Company (ill. 3, p. 48).

La conception étonnante et la relative monumentalité de l’église sont particulièrement intrigantes étant donné son emplacement dans ce quartier à la fois industriel et résidentiel. De nos jours, les nombreux touristes de la ville se désintéressent systématiquement de ce secteur et les habitants évitent généralement d’y passer, ce qui marginalise indûment le quartier en dépit de son importance historique par rapport au reste de la ville, voire à la région tout entière. Et pourtant, les clochers symétriques de l’église, hauts de près de 39 mètres et visibles de plusieurs points de vue, s’intègrent fièrement dans le paysage familier de Magog, attirant l’attention avec insistance sur ses origines historiques. La façade noble et géométrique de l’église confère aux environs une impression rassurante d’accessibilité et de stabilité (ill. 1, p. 46).

À la fin des années 1940, l’église et l’usine de Sainte-Marguerite-Marie sont parfois des alliées et parfois des adversaires non déclarées. Apparemment, les deux institutions se débrouillent pour s’entendre aussi souvent qu’elles ne s’entendent pas en ce qui concerne leurs ouailles et leurs ouvriers. Les deux forces forment une alliance socio-économique officieuse et non déclarée, cimentée par leur aversion pour l’expansion communiste de l’après-guerre, par leurs efforts pour se moderniser et par leur intérêt commun dans le quotidien des ouvriers, perpétuant ainsi une dynamique ambiguë entre elles. Cette mécanique tortueuse, caractérisée par des politiques et des loyautés inconstantes, est mue par une conception aveugle de l’ordre social et par un objectif commun : tenir les ouvriers sous leur joug. Par exemple, en 1900, les dirigeants de la filature demandent au seul prêtre catholique de la ville d’intervenir lorsque 400 ouvriers débraient spontanément pour une toute première fois à Magog [20]. Une réunion est rapidement organisée au presbytère de Saint-Patrice, où les travailleurs déclarent « qu’ils sont capables de se gouverner seuls [21] » et rejettent ce qu’ils perçoivent comme les interventions trop zélées du prêtre. En 1909, au cours d’une autre grève, on rapporte que « le curé Brassard de Magog prend une attitude franchement hostile aux grévistes [22] ». En dépit de ce schisme initial entre le clergé et les ouvriers, la Confédération des travailleurs catholiques du Canada (CTCC) est finalement fondée en 1921 [23]. Ce syndicat modéré « puis[e] son inspiration dans la doctrine sociale de l’Église [24] ». Grâce au soutien apporté par l’Église au syndicat, devenu le Syndicat catholique des ouvriers du textile de Magog en 1935 [25], « le mouvement ouvrier [est] maintenant perçu par la communauté comme un partenaire social respecté et un moyen de défense légitime pour les travailleurs [26] ». Cependant, la Dominion Textile Company prend clairement position en déclarant ouvertement dans le journal local que même si elle « préférait les syndicats catholiques aux centrales américaines […] elle n’avait aucune intention de laisser un tiers intervenir entre elle et sa main-d’oeuvre [27] ».

Influences sur l’architecture religieuse au Québec

Né en Allemagne dans les années 1930, un mouvement de réforme liturgique catholique pousse les architectes à imaginer des manières d’asseoir les fidèles plus près de l’autel afin d’enrichir leur participation aux célébrations eucharistiques [28]. En définitive, le pape Pie XII donne officiellement son approbation au mouvement en 1947 et encourage « la participation active des fidèles au sacrifice eucharistique, en union étroite avec le prêtre [29] ». Il recommande vivement aux évêques du monde entier de mettre en oeuvre, au sein de leurs diocèses respectifs, les moyens de favoriser la participation à la fois de l’assemblée et du prêtre pendant la célébration de la sainte communion [30]. Tout au long de cette période transitoire, deux groupes exercent leur influence au sein de l’Église : les tenants de l’idéologie de L’Art d’église et les défenseurs des positions de L’Art sacré. Publiées en France, ces revues réclament un renouvellement de l’architecture religieuse, mais L’Art sacré, la plus progressiste des deux, exprime une opinion un peu plus radicale [31].

L’Art d’église est fondé en 1927. Sa mission consiste à guider l’Église vers de nouvelles voies architecturales tout en assurant le respect des principes établis et des traditions académiques. Le directeur de la publication soutient que les trois erreurs fondamentales de l’architecture moderne sont sa subjectivité, son symbolisme arbitraire et sa fonctionnalité [32]. Il est important de relever ici que les plans de Poulin pour l’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie contiennent ces trois mêmes « erreurs fondamentales ». La revue juge que la forme et la fonction ne sont pas compatibles. Fondamentalement, elle affirme que les qualités architecturales formelles de l’église relèvent de l’architecte mais que les critères de fonctionnalité de ce lieu saint sont inséparables de la nature sacrée de l’Église catholique, donc hors de portée de l’autorité des architectes [33].

L’Art sacré est imprimé pour la première fois en 1935. Le fondateur de cette revue, Maurice Denis, réclame l’utilisation de matériaux modernes, surtout du béton ; une construction rationnelle et une décoration simple qui évite de recourir à l’illusion tridimensionnelle [34]. Les deux revues approuvent la modernité, même si Denis préconise une fonctionnalité architecturale opposée à celle proposée par L’Art d’église. Les dirigeants de L’Art sacré aiment la simplicité et rejettent l’ostentation ; ils préfèrent les églises comme celle de Sainte-Marguerite-Marie, qui trouve un écho dans sa communauté, plutôt que celles qui symbolisent une maison de Dieu élaborée et luxueuse :

[L’église] doit avoir un caractère sacré qui la distingue des autres édifices. Mais il ne faut pas que cette distinction la fasse paraître plus importante que l’usine ou le cinéma, ni qu’elle lui confère un rôle dominant par rapport à eux [35].

Les églises cessent progressivement de représenter la maison de Dieu et deviennent les maisons du peuple de Dieu [36]. La conception originale de Poulin est à l’image des ouvriers. Il la qualifie d’unique, déclarant que « la paroisse Sainte-Marguerite-Marie peut se dire qu’elle possède un temple dont il n’existe nul [sic] part ailleurs de modèle [37] ». Ses plans illustrent concrètement les recommandations des éditeurs de L’Art sacré pour orienter l’architecture de l’Église catholique dans de nouvelles directions.

Les caractéristiques novatrices et progressistes du plan de Poulin

Les lignes orthogonales de l’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie permettent à la structure de s’intégrer de manière homogène au bâti environnant. Sa conception irrégulière s’harmonise avec l’aménagement urbain erratique de la paroisse, amorcé au début du xixe siècle. Le rattachement du presbytère à l’église reproduit la croissance graduelle de l’usine voisine, à laquelle la compagnie ajoute édifice sur édifice. En outre, les plans de Poulin reflètent cette tendance optimiste et expérimentale de l’architecture de l’après-guerre qui consiste à épouser la modernité. En tant que professionnel expérimenté et prolifique, Poulin adopte de toute évidence une démarche novatrice et progressiste dans son travail à Sainte-Marguerite-Marie. Il confirme : « Nul doute, cet édifice est comme un essai entièrement nouveau pour appliquer les principes de l’architecture moderne à la construction des églises [38]. » Ses plans dénotent également une compréhension intuitive de l’importance de l’usine pour la paroisse ouvrière et l’histoire du « bas de ville ».

Si on compare ces plans de Poulin à ses autres plans d’église de l’époque, on constate avant tout à quel point la forme géométrique rectiligne de Sainte-Marguerite-Marie rappelle remarquablement la forme de l’usine par son toit plat et par sa masse structurelle dense et obstinément horizontale, qui respire au rythme des pans verticaux réguliers. Ses clochers jumeaux font écho aux deux tours de l’usine (ill. 6, p. 53). Bergeron confirme : « Il n’existe pas dans l’architecture d’après-guerre d’autres églises à façades symétriques dominées par deux clochers monumentaux [39]. » Ceci permet de croire que Poulin s’écarte délibérément des pratiques architecturales en vigueur afin de faire référence à des éléments architecturaux de l’usine voisine.

L’église est faite de béton armé revêtu de blocs de granite brut de Trois-Rivières, taillés sur mesure et sur place. Toutes les ouvertures, y compris les embrasures de portes, sont bordées de pierre de granite lisse et contrastante. Toutes les embrasures de portes et les entrées comportent des angles droits et rectilignes, dépourvus d’arches à l’intérieur ou à l’extérieur de l’édifice [40], tout comme l’usine d’à côté. Les pierres polies composent des détails décoratifs en créant un contraste texturé avec la surface plus rugueuse des blocs de l’édifice, exposant un extérieur essentiellement monochrome, clin d’oeil aux structures tout aussi unies de l’usine, faites de brique rouge. L’utilisation par Poulin de motifs à degrés de polissage contrastant ou de motifs intercalant pierre polie et pierre brute pour donner du rythme à la surface monotone de l’extérieur rappelle l’utilisation, par T. Pringle & Son’s, de bandes de béton horizontales contrastantes, par la couleur et la texture, pour contrebalancer la maçonnerie de brique rouge prédominante (ill. 7, p. 54). De plus gros blocs de pierre ont été utilisés sur la surface extérieure du second sous-sol de l’église. Les rangées plus élevées sont constituées de bandes plus étroites et plus courtes de pierres posées selon une séquence qui présente des similitudes avec la maçonnerie de brique de l’usine.

Les deux édifices sont ornés de pilastres à intervalles réguliers, créant du coup une impression générale de symétrie dont s’imprègnent les élévations latérales à l’est et à l’ouest. Leur rythme répétitif impose un mouvement latéral tout en insérant une direction verticale alternée, ce qui confère un équilibre aux grands murs imposants. Chaque édifice fait contraster le haut des pilastres. Le regard est dirigé vers le haut, ce qui accentue l’orientation verticale secondaire et subordonnée de la composition. Poulin insère un seul losange uniforme entre chaque paire de pilastres et les coiffe d’un fronton pointant vers les cieux. Les intervalles entre les pilastres déterminent l’emplacement symétrique, homogène et régulier du fenestrage tout en tranchant avec la mise en valeur latérale des murs. Les fenêtres des niveaux inférieurs et intermédiaires sont essentiellement orientées à la verticale ; la résistance des pilastres à la forme horizontale dominante des deux édifices n’en est que renforcée. Les rangées supérieures de fenêtres horizontales de l’usine ajoutent de la variété et du contraste au fenestrage vertical, ce qui accroît l’impression de clarté à mesure que l’on se rapproche du toit plat. Poulin emprunte carrément à l’usine les délicates cavités carrées du haut que l’on trouve sur ses plans. Disposées en méticuleux losanges séparant les fenêtres des niveaux inférieurs et intermédiaires, ces cavités ont une fonction purement décorative. Poulin les fait pivoter horizontalement, rappel des rangées de fenêtres horizontales, et les place en rangées de trois. L’utilisation répétitive de trios par l’architecte fait symboliquement référence à la trinité chrétienne, un thème récurrent dans sa conception de l’église. Ce faisant, il reprend à son compte la théorie de L’Art sacré voulant qu’une église ait « un caractère sacré qui la distingue des autres édifices [41] » sans nécessairement la faire paraître plus importante que les bâtiments environnants. Les marches du devant menant au portail géométrique de l’église sont disposées en un éventail qui se prolonge au-delà de la largeur de la façade et qui dote l’entrée de l’édifice d’un accès vaste et dégagé vers son seuil afin de faire bon accueil aux fidèles, comme le prescrit l’image renouvelée de l’Église catholique en tant que maison du peuple de Dieu.

Les éléments décoratifs extérieurs sont manifestement subordonnés à la construction de l’église, conformément aux théories préconisées par les rationalistes. Les façades de l’église et de l’usine sont caractérisées par de discrets faux frontons rectilignes remarquablement semblables qui s’élèvent légèrement au-dessus des toits plats. Cela permet aux édifices de respecter un plan centré et de présenter de subtiles ornementations dépourvues de fonction (ill. 8, p. 55). Les clochers symétriques flanquant chaque côté du frontispice de l’église sont assurément les éléments les plus traditionnels de la conception de Poulin. Les hautes tours majestueuses sont les phares de cette paroisse ouvrière mais sont également visibles depuis les quartiers plus aisés de la ville, à l’ouest et au nord. Les tours à lames de cuivre constituent les détails extérieurs les plus ornés et les plus richement décorés. Le motif à chevron inversé trace le contour d’un triangle équilatéral tout en pointant vers le ciel avec la précision d’une pointe de flèche vers ce que Poulin appelle « l’au-delà ». Selon Richard Taylor, les triangles équilatéraux sont l’un des « plus anciens symboles chrétiens, l’égalité des côtés des angles représentant l’égalité des personnes de la Trinité [42] ». Poulin répète le motif sur le haut des pilastres à l’extérieur et sur le sol en mosaïque de marbre broyé à l’intérieur. Le regard est ainsi dirigé vers l’autel et vers le tabernacle, deux des objets les plus sacrés de l’église. Taylor déclare que « dans plusieurs sens, et à différents degrés, les églises étaient conçues pour être lues [43] ». De même, dans The Meaning of the Built Environment, Amos Rapoport explique que « si la conception de l’environnement est vue en partie comme un processus d’encodage de l’information, alors les utilisateurs peuvent être vus comme s’ils étaient en train de la décoder. Si le code n’est pas partagé ou compris, l’environnement ne communique pas [44] ». Compte tenu de ce postulat, on peut interpréter l’utilisation de la répétition par Poulin comme une stratégie de communication avec les ouvriers, car la routine et les cycles répétitifs sont des motifs quotidiens familiers au sein du milieu de travail ouvrier. En outre, soutient Rapoport, « en multipliant les redondances, la probabilité que les messages et les significations soient compris est grandement accrue [45] ».

La simplicité extraordinaire de l’intérieur et l’utilisation systématique de la répétition sont cohérentes (ill. 9, p. 56). Toutes les fenêtres du premier étage sont ornées d’une série de vitraux représentant des marguerites [46] identiques, l’une des variétés « communes » de fleurs des champs du Québec, en l’honneur de la sainte patronne de cette église. La forme de la marguerite est reprise partout à l’intérieur, par exemple sur le sol en terrazzo et sur les moulures décorant le plafond et les murs. On a eu recours à un procédé, moderne pour l’époque, qui consiste à uniformiser le plafond plat et les murs de la nef et du choeur en les enduisant du même plâtre ; ce traitement qui fait appel aux mêmes matériaux, à des couleurs unies et à un éclairage d’intensité égale unifie les deux espaces. Les poutres à caisson et les colonnes sont espacées à intervalles réguliers sur le plafond et sur les murs, mettant en valeur le décor minimaliste original de l’intérieur. Les moulures en bois à motifs décorent le mobilier en cerisier du choeur et bordent les lambris supérieurs du choeur et de la nef tout en assurant la cohésion et en gommant davantage la distinction entre les deux espaces. Les mêmes moulures à motifs sont également utilisées pour border la saillie de la galerie et pour encadrer la partie supérieure des embrasures de portes.

L’édifice est une structure à deux étages. On a recours à une nef unique au niveau supérieur, plus courte et beaucoup plus large, dans le but de faire asseoir les fidèles plus près de l’autel. Le plancher de la nef descend en pente douce vers l’autel. On estime que la pente est une façon tout à fait novatrice d’encourager l’assemblée à se rapprocher du sanctuaire, tel que recommandé par la réforme liturgique. Le niveau inférieur devient un théâtre, doté d’une billetterie, et est également caractérisé par une pente douce descendant vers la scène [47].

La grande salle paroissiale aménagée par Poulin au sous-sol représente un atout moderne intéressant pour les défenseurs de L’Art sacré. Cette revue présente sous un jour favorable la participation de la paroisse au sein de l’Église en tant que collectif chrétien qui applique concrètement les innovations architecturales. Poulin décrit l’importance du sous-sol de l’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie pour la paroisse :

L’église proprement dite s’élève au-dessus d’un vaste soubassement, bien éclairé ; on aperçoit les entrées de la salle paroissiale, élément devenu presque indispensable dans tous nos programmes d’église, et faisant de celle-ci un centre social en même temps qu’un lieu de prière [48].

Entre tradition et modernité

Bergeron avance que « Sainte-Marguerite-Marie exprime fort bien un curieux paradoxe : elle se démarque au moment de sa construction par des innovations, mais demeure éminemment classique dans sa composition [49] ». Il y a des dizaines d’années, Peter Collins a défendu la banalité de l’architecture moderne en définissant son message comme étant « commun à tous ». Il a fait valoir qu’un architecte réussit quand il astreint les formes architecturales à s’harmoniser avec les formes plus anciennes sans sacrifier un seul des principes propres à l’âge moderne [50]. L’église de Poulin semble plus vieille qu’elle ne l’est réellement, car sa conception épouse les formes existantes de la région, incluant l’usine établie de longue date ainsi que les premières maisons. Bergeron situe l’architecture de Sainte-Marguerite quelque part entre la modernité et la tradition. Nous sommes d’accord et notons que la conception extraordinaire de l’église par cet architecte rappelle les origines de la paroisse, en 1921, sans jamais cesser de dialoguer avec sa voisine autoritaire et massive, l’usine en évolution progressive. Si Poulin avait conçu une église plus humble et à plus petite échelle, conformément aux tendances diocésaines de l’époque, il n’aurait pas fait honneur à l’importance historique de la paroisse, que ce soit par rapport à la ville dans son ensemble ou en ce qui concerne la position sociale de l’Église catholique confrontée aux installations imposantes de la Dominion Textile Company. Poulin a sciemment et délibérément conçu une église qui paraît plus vieille qu’elle ne l’est afin d’imposer le rang historique de la paroisse aux deux autres paroisses catholiques de Magog : la plus vieille, Saint-Patrice, fondée en 1894, et la plus jeune, Saint-Jean-Bosco, fondée en 1945 (ill. 10, p. 56 et 57).

***

Au début des années 1940, la majorité de la main-d’oeuvre qui travaille à l’usine vit dans l’ombre de ses installations, aux sens propre et figuré. Poulin crée une église qui trouve un écho dans le quotidien des ouvriers et qui témoigne de leur rôle primordial au sein de la communauté. Il conçoit un édifice à la demande de la paroisse ouvrière, un temple digne de sa contribution à la communauté et à la ville de Magog tout entière. Si l’église paraît plus vieille qu’elle ne l’est, c’est grâce aux fondateurs de la paroisse ; il s’agit donc d’une reconnaissance de l’histoire de la communauté. Une structure moderne comme l’église Saint-Jean-Bosco paraîtrait déplacée dans un lieu dont les origines remontent au xixe siècle. Poulin dessine ingénieusement une église en y intégrant des techniques et des innovations modernes, à l’image du progrès industriel représenté par l’usine. En utilisant des matériaux durables et de qualité, il trouve la parade pour répondre officiellement à son imposante voisine. Les travailleurs sont déjà familiarisés avec les innovations technologiques, car l’usine modernise régulièrement ses installations et son équipement. Ainsi, l’église emboîte le pas à la tendance moderne de l’après-guerre sans négliger le passé de la paroisse. Cet exemple architectural unique, véritable pont entre modernité et tradition, est bâti pour durer. Ce design exceptionnel incarne la fierté communautaire des paroissiens et leur volonté de revendiquer leur place dans le plan d’aménagement urbain de la ville de Magog. Ces éloges en font foi : « Sainte-Marguerite-Marie se démarque sur le plan régional autant que national [51]. » Bergeron ajoute : « Une église aussi imposante et d’une aussi grande qualité située au coeur d’un quartier ouvrier a une valeur de représentativité élevée [52]. »

La conception de Poulin concrétise « l’idée que les édifices communiquent avec leurs utilisateurs dans un univers banal d’idées généralement répandues [53] ». Si les tenaces travailleurs s’étaient contentés d’une structure moins monumentale et de moins bonne qualité, leur héritage aurait pu, ces dernières années, être rayé de manière permanente du paysage urbain de la ville de Magog. Poulin remet en question la division hiérarchique entre les deux autorités de la paroisse en incorporant subtilement des éléments architecturaux de l’usine à son plan. L’esprit de modernité prend sa source dans la rupture avec l’oppression et les limites traditionnelles. La conception rectiligne de Poulin conteste les hiérarchies conventionnelles de l’architecture religieuse en favorisant un traitement et une organisation générale relativement uniformes. Ses plans allègent l’autorité de l’Église de manière symbolique et rationnelle en améliorant physiquement et intellectuellement son accessibilité par le jeu de la simplicité, décrivant ainsi la qualité fondamentale de la conception du bâtiment :

La simplicité, l’unité et la clarté sont les caractères principaux qui font de cette église un lieu de paix et de prière […] La décoration de l’église est aussi toute simple. Le principal motif représente une marguerite, une humble fleur des champs [54].

Bien que nous soyons en droit de nous demander si, oui ou non, le curé Vel a bel et bien proclamé, en 1949, que « la future église de Sainte-Marguerite sera belle à voir [55] », une chose est claire : aujourd’hui, l’église est telle qu’elle était au moment de son achèvement en 1950, un artéfact qui incarne incontestablement la quête de la modernité pour circonscrire l’extraordinaire dans l’ordinaire. C’est un héritage magnifique légué à la ville et aux générations futures par les travailleurs en reconnaissance de leurs existences et de leurs luttes quotidiennes. C’est un hommage à l’architecte qui a su reconnaître et donner de la dignité à cette classe souvent marginalisée et pourtant culturellement irremplaçable au sein de l’histoire sociale du Québec et de son identité culturelle.

Pour les ouvriers, l’achèvement de l’église marque le moment décisif de l’affirmation de leur identité au sein du paysage de la ville. La construction de l’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie symbolise leur contribution collective à la région ; l’érection de leur propre structure monumentale ébranle le monopole omniprésent de l’usine. Celle-ci appartient à de lointains actionnaires tandis que l’église Sainte-Marguerite-Marie appartient à des ouvriers bien présents. Aujourd’hui, grâce à sa conception, à ses dimensions et à ses matériaux d’origine locale, la bibliothèque municipale, autrefois église de paroisse, est devenue un monument aux ouvriers qui ont non seulement créé cette communauté mais aussi contribué au développement industriel et à la prospérité de la ville. Poulin connaissait bien la paroisse. Il n’ignorait rien de l’influence de l’usine sur la vie des ouvriers. Il a donc conçu un lieu de culte à la fois ancré dans leur existence laborieuse et affranchi de leur travail quotidien, créant non sans bonheur un exemple unique d’architecture religieuse avec un pied dans la modernité et un autre dans la tradition. L’édifice atteste les contributions historiques notables d’une classe sociale souvent passée sous silence et dont le pénible labeur, l’engagement social et les valeurs ont considérablement façonné le patrimoine et le paysage culturel contemporain du Québec [56].

Appendices

Appendices