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Canadian Literary MealsLettres canadiennes au menu

On As for Me and My House, by Sinclair RossInspiré du roman As For Me and My House de Sinclair Ross

  • CuiZine editorial team (nc)

Biographical notes on the photographer

Rita Taylor’s career in photography began in 2001 after obtaining a degree from the University of Toronto in Art and Art History and a Diploma in Fine Art from Sheridan College. She currently lives and works in Banff as owner of Rita Taylor Photography and as a staff photographer at the Banff Centre.  (www.ritataylor.com / @ritataylor).

Rita Taylor a obtenu son baccalauréat en histoire de l’art et arts plastiques à L’Université de Toronto (2001), et un certificat en beaux-arts du Sheridan College. Présentement, elle demeure à Banff, travaillant comme photographe officielle au « Banff Centre for the Arts ». Elle a aussi son propre studio à Banff, Rita Taylor Photography (www.ritataylor.com / @ritataylor)

Corps de l’article

In this issue, Rita Taylor takes inspiration from novel As for Me and My House by Sinclair Ross. A sequence of photos shows a plate of fried sausages, "frizzled up and brown" and served alongside fried potatoes and tomato sauce, just as Ross' narrator described them.

Image 1

Overview of Sausages on a Plate.

Photo by Rita Taylor
Overview of Sausages on a Plate.

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In this novel that reads almost like a diary, this is one of the meals described by a narrator we know only as "Mrs. Bentley". We are so immersed in her perspective that we, as readers, have to work hard to see her as if from a distance, as if in side view.

Image 2

Side view of the Plate and Chair.

Photo by Rita Taylor
Side view of the Plate and Chair.

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In the dustbowl era, this mouthwatering plate would be a welcome luxury.

Image 3

Portrait of a Delicious Meal.

Photo by Rita Taylor
Portrait of a Delicious Meal.

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Two images focus on the bright colours of canned peaches, which bring a welcome sunshine to the dreary dustbowl supper table.

Image 4

Ray of Peach Sunshine and Biscuits.

Photo by Rita Taylor
Ray of Peach Sunshine and Biscuits.

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Mrs. Bentley explains that she keeps a tin of peaches on hand for "unexpected company". When Steve comes for supper, with the "aid of some biscuits", they do succeed "in brightening up Steve a little". But Mrs. Bentley's husband Philip is not so easily cheered. At this very awkward supper, Philip speaks in an "abrupt, disjointed way" and the narrator finds that "his eyes kept slipping past" her.

Image 5

Dimmed Rays of Peach Sunshine and Chair.

Photo by Rita Taylor
Dimmed Rays of Peach Sunshine and Chair.

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