Enjeux et société Approches transdisciplinaires

Managing editor(s): Normand Labrie (Co-directeur), Jason Luckerhoff (Co-directeur) / Editor(s): François Guillemette (Rédacteur en chef), Marie-Josée Berthiaume (Coordonnatrice à l'édition)

Journal preceded by Approches inductives: Travail intellectuel et construction des connaissances

About

The journal Enjeux et société is above all Francophone and transdisciplinary.

Ontario’s Francophone community is the largest in Canada outside Quebec. Rooted in the plurality of la Francophonie in Ontario and beyond, Enjeux et société is committed to the values ​​of multiculturalism and intercultural dialogue, which are profoundly linked with multilingualism. Enjeux et société will foster rich collaboration in diverse fields of knowledge and human activity at the heart of la Francophonie.

Transdisciplinarity makes it possible to confront the major challenges of the 21st century by recognizing the limits of disciplines, taking into account the full range of discourse and encouraging excellence that transcends disciplinary limits. Critical readers of fragmented, compartmentalized and monodisciplinary approaches to knowledge who wish to explore broader fact sets will be able to do so through the lens of numerous disciplines. Transdisciplinarity not only promotes the  decompartmentalization of disciplines, but also of scientific discourse itself.

Examining the contributions of various disciplines through the six thematic pillars of Enjeux et société will allow the most crucial contemporary questions to be explored. These pillars represent six axes of program studies and transdisciplinary research, that reflect the major social issues of the 21st century:

HUMAN PLURALITY: Transdisciplinary pillar in which human being is studied in all its plurality: social, cultural, linguistic, religious, ethnic, etc., and throughout the different phases of life from childhood to old age ( referencing body, cognition , education, language, health), in diverse forms of social, community, political and institutional organization (including community engagement and social innovation), and focusing on the social processes that influence contemporary Francophone life ( migration, economic and professional transformations, social inclusion and exclusion, multiple identities, multilingualism, etc.).

DIGITAL CULTURE: Transdisciplinary pillar for the study of modes of innovation made possible by digital developments affecting the body and its movements, speech and its various registers, culture, as well as the visual and aural arts. New forms of human interaction, communication, education and creation using digital media, technologies and methodologies will be examined. Areas of exploration include social media, free access, video and electronic games, virtual and augmented reality, visualization, open data, big data, the cloud and artificial intelligence.

URBAN ENVIRONMENTS: Transdisciplinary pillar for the study and conception of urban environments and the human activity contained therein, beginning with human ecology and taking into account institutional organizations, services and infrastructure, as well as natural features including topography, environment and climate. The study of urban environments addresses housing, the built environment and public spaces, personal mobility networks and the movement of goods and services, as well as social and cultural practices, especially in the context of smart cities. It examines urban practices in different environments (neighborhood, work, cultural and sporting spaces) from the perspectives of design, urban planning, sustainable resource management and social intervention.

GLOBALIZED ECONOMY: Transdisciplinary pillar for the study of the global economy, human resources and entrepreneurship, and, more specifically of financial products (markets, stock markets, savings and investments) and the various aspects of their management including governance, ethics and social responsibility. Taxation, customs and excise, social economy and development are also explored in the context of a globalized economy (both transnational and multilingual).

PEDAGOGICAL INNOVATION: Transdisciplinary pillar for the study of pedagogical approaches other than the transmissive model; approaches which place the student at the center of learning. In particular, pedagogy that guides student actions, experiential pedagogy, competence-based learning and cooperative programs will be explored within specific themed editions of the journal focusing on pedagogical innovation.

INDUCTIVE APPROACHES: Transdisciplinary pillar in which inductive methods of intellectual enquiry are studied, meaning, the methodological issues in scientific research and pedagogy related to the construction of knowledge. The study of empirical, theoretical, historical, conceptual and critical contributions to the epistemological project which in some ways overturn the traditional order of the hypothetical-deductive approach. Inductive approaches prioritize research data over already constituted theories, lived experience rather than prescriptions, field work rather than explanatory frameworks, in order to reclaim the knowings utilized in a construction of knowledge.

 

Contact

For more information contact: Coordination_revue@uontario.ca

Back issues (2 issues)

Permanent archiving of articles on Érudit is provided by Portico.

Editorial policy and ethics

Editorial policy

The journal Enjeux & Société: Approaches transdisciplinaires is an open access scientific journal. Submitted manuscripts are peer-reviewed using the double-blind review process, in accordance with quality standards common to scholarly journals. To be considered for publication, the proposed manuscript must comply with the following general guidelines:

· Be unpublished and not have been submitted to another publication for consideration

· Make an original contribution to the advancement of knowledge

· Be written in French, in a clear style and using a vocabulary accessible to a readership from diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

The manuscript must include the title, an abstract of 150 words maximum, a list of three to five keywords, an introduction, a statement of the issue, objectives, methodology, principles of analysis of data and documentation, research results, conclusion, relevant and complete references, and a list of these references (ie all the references mentioned in the body of the text and in the notes). References must be ordered alphabetically by author, and conform to American Psychological Association (APA) standards. Professor Marc Couture has provided a French adaptation of these bibliographic standards available at http://benhur.teluq.uquebec.ca/~mcouture/apa/.

To view exemplars, click on the “Pense-bête” link on his website.

Peer review process

Upon receiving a manuscript, the Journal’s directors or the Issue’s editors will provide an initial opinion as to its compliance with the general guidelines, highlight the manuscript’s strengths, and make suggestions with a view to improving it. After receiving this feedback, authors still wishing to have their work published in Enjeux et société can revise and resubmit it for further evaluation. Reviewers are encouraged to provide constructive comments to support the improvement of the manuscript. In doing so the quality standards for scientific texts are not lowered, but rather help is offered to attain them.

Ethical requirements

Each of the authors or co-authors must make the following declarations:

 I declare that the manuscript submitted to the journal Enjeux et société has not been submitted to, accepted by, or published in any other publication.

I declare that I have respected the intellectual property rights for all the publications I have cited, or that I have specifically referred to in my text.

 I declare that the submitted manuscript is free from plagiarism and self-plagiarism.

 I declare that I have the legal authorizations for each of the photographs and images accompanying the text, when these authorizations are required.

I declare that I have indicated the source and the copyright for each of the photographs and images, when required.


Instruction pour les auteurs

Instructions to authors

To be considered for publication, the proposed manuscript must comply with the following general guidelines:

· Be unpublished and not have been submitted to another publication for consideration

· Make an original contribution to the advancement of knowledge

· Be written in French, in a clear style and using a vocabulary accessible to a readership from diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

The manuscript must include the title, an abstract of 150 words maximum, a list of three to five keywords, an introduction, a statement of the issue, objectives, methodology, principles of analysis of data and documentation, research results, conclusion, relevant and complete references, and a list of these references (ie all the references mentioned in the body of the text and in the notes). References must be ordered alphabetically by author, and conform to American Psychological Association (APA) standards. Professor Marc Couture has provided a French adaptation of these bibliographic standards available at http://benhur.teluq.uquebec.ca/~mcouture/apa/.

To view exemplars, click on the “Pense-bête” link on his website.

Manuscript submissions should be emailed to:  coordination_revue@uontario.ca.

Each co-author must be CC’d, if applicable.

An acknowledgment of receipt will be sent.

The body of the email must contain:

The declarations of ethical requirements (above).

The first and last name (s) of each author or authors, as well as their affiliations, email address, a brief bio of approximately five lines in length ( including last diploma obtained, current position, research domains and fields of interest).

The manuscript itself should be sent as an attachment in Word format (.docx ), and be written according to the general guidelines mentioned above while respecting the detailed standards that follow.

 

Detailed Standards

Format: .docx

Size: US Letter: 8.5 '' × 11 '' (21.6 cm × 28 cm)

Length: Between 40,000 and 60,000 characters (spaces included) including the summary, tables, figures, notes and references.

Margins: 2.5 cm on each side

Line spacing: 1.5

Font size: 12 points. Used for all words in the manuscript, including in the figures.

Font: Times New Roman

Subheadings: Numbered in order to clearly define the hierarchy (eg, 1., 1.1, 1.1.1), up to a maximum of four levels of  subheading.

Subheadings not to be numbered: Abstract, Keywords, Introduction, Conclusion and References.
 

Italics: Use for book titles, non-French language foreign words, and words that designate themselves (autonyms).
 

Bold: Use only for headings and subheadings.

Underline: Do not use.

Accents: Don't forget to accent capital letters as required.

Quotation marks: Use only for quotations, definitions and neologisms (either of form or meaning), and to indicate the use of a qualified word. Use French quotation marks (« ») single-spaced. Use English quotation marks (‘‘ ’’) only within a quote already in French quotation marks.

 

Quotes/Citations:

Any quote should be followed by the source from which it came and the page number (in the case of a paginated document). Example: (Germain, 1999, p. 200).

Short quote (less than 40 words): Use French quotation marks inside the paragraph.

Long quote (40 words and more): Present without quotation marks, by indenting text on each side.

Foreign language quote: Any quote in a foreign language (including English) must be translated into French in the body of the text, and indicated as such.

The original quote should be included in a footnote in the following format: 1. "Quote" [translated freely] (Reference, with page number).

Footnotes are placed at the end of each quote (after the closing quotation mark for a short quote, or the last word for a long quote).

Citations in the text (and in the notes): Place citations in the text immediately after the quote or the word to which they refer, and include them in the list of references and not in footnotes.

Notes:

Place notes at the end of the text, except for quotes in foreign languages

Number them continuously

Use the Word footnote function

Place footnote before punctuation.

Editorial board

International scientific committee:

David Arturo Acosta Silva (Corporación Universitaria Unitec, Bogotá, Colombie)

Rodrigo Bandeira-de-Mello (Escola de Administração de Empresas, Sao Paulo, Brésil)

Olivier Bégin-Caouette (Université de Montréal, Canada)

Geneviève Bergeron (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Julie Boissonneault (Université Laurentienne, Canada)

Michaël Bourgatte (Institut Catholique de Paris, France)

Luc Bussières (Recteur, Université de Hearst, Canada)

Michaël Cantinotti (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Caroline Caron (Université du Québec en Outaouais, Canada)

Linda Cardinal (Université d’Ottawa, Canada)

France Cloutier (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Alain Colsoul (Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgique)

Juliet Corbin (San Jose State University, États-Unis)

Ann Dale (Royal Roads University, Canada)

Jennifer Denis (Université de Mons, Belgique)

Tomas Dorta (Université de Montréal, Canada)

Lionel Garreau (Université Paris-Dauphine, France)

Charles Gaucher (Université de Moncton, Canada)

Annick Germain (INRS, Canada)

Bertrand Gervais (Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada)

Astrid Gynnild (University of Bergen, Norway)

Rosine Horincq Detournay (Université libre de Bruxelle, Belgique)

Demba Kane (Université Gaston Berger de Saint Louis du Sénégal)

Krzysztof Konecki (Lodz University, Poland)

Stéphane Labbé (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

François Labelle (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Normand Labrie (Université de l'Ontario français, Canada)

Sylvie A. Lamoureux (Université d’Ottawa, Canada)

Marie-Claude Lapointe (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Sophie Lapointe (Université du Québec à Montréal)

Vincent Larivière (Université de Montréal, Canada)

Didier Lecordier (Université de Nantes, France)

Christophe Lejeune (Université de Liège, Belgique)

Marieme S. Lo (Université de Toronto, Canada)

Jason Luckerhoff (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Martin Maltais (Université du Québec à Rimouski, Canada)

Anik Meunier (Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada)

Claudine Moïse (Université Grenoble Alpes, France)

Joséphine Mukamurera (Université de Sherbrooke, Canada)

Serge Théophile Nomo (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Geneviève Pagé (Université du Québec en Outaouais, Canada)

Marie-Josée Plouffe (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada)

Laetitia Pozniak (Université de Mons, Belgique)

Tinasoa Razafindrazaka (Université d'Antananarivo, Madagascar)

Marilyne Savard (Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada)

William Straw (Université McGill, Canada)

Bassirou Tidjani (Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Sénégal)

Mohsen Toumi (Institut Supérieur des langues de Gabès, Tunisie)

Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay (TELUQ – Canada)

Michèle Vatz Laaroussi (Université de Sherbrooke, Canada)

Blé Marcel Yoro (Université de Cocody, Côte d'Ivoire)